Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf

BookInterdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf

Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf

Clemson University Press: Woolf Selected Papers

2013

June 1st, 2013

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Interdisciplinary/Multidisciplinary Woolf comprises thirty-five essays selected from papers delivered at the 22nd Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf, hosted by the University of Saskatchewan. Contributors link inter- and multidisciplinary scholarship to the intellectual and creative projects of Woolf and her modernist peers. Essays that identify and extend points of contact between literary studies and varied disciplines are arranged in four thematic sections: "History, Materiality, Multiplicity"; "Patterns, Practices, Principles"; "Art, Influence, Embodiment"; and "Publishing, Politics, Publics." This collection contains writing by established and emergent scholars, including Susan Brown, Patricia Clements, and Isobel Grundy (editors of Orlando: Women's Writing in the British Isles, from the Beginnings to the Present); Leslie Kathleen Hankins; Maggie Humm; and Brenda Silver.

Full notes on Contributors: Adam Barrows is an Associate Professor in the English department at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario. He is the author of The Cosmic Time of Empire: Modern Britain and World Literature (University of California Press 2011) and a recipient of the Modern Fiction Studies Margaret Church Memorial Prize. Claire Battershill is a Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at the Ontario College of Art and Design University. She recently completed her Ph.D. dissertation, “Biography and Autobiography at the Hogarth Press” at the University of Toronto. Her first book, Circus, a collection of short stories, is forthcoming with McClelland and Stewart in 2014. Sarah Blake was born in Wales in 1983. She studied English Literature at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and has an M.A. in Art and Design (Studio Practice) from Loughborough University. For examples of her work visit: Marlene A. Briggs, Assistant Professor of English at the University of British Columbia, teaches twentieth-century literature. Her research examines the legacies of the First World War in British writers ranging from Wilfred Owen to Carol Ann Duffy. She has published on D. H. Lawrence, Doris Lessing, Virginia Woolf, and others. Christopher Brown recently received his M.A. in Rhetoric/Composition and Literature from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, where he completed a thesis entitled, “A World Without Other: Orlando, Nightwood, and Kristevan Discourses of the Self.” He currently teaches at Cal Poly Pomona and Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, California. Susan Brown is Professor of English at the University of Guelph and Visiting Professor at the University of Alberta. She works on Victorian literature, women’s writing, and digital humanities. All of these interests inform Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (Cambridge UP 2006), an online literary historical textbase and testbed for experiments in digital literary history co-edited with Patricia Clements and Isobel Grundy. She leads development of the Canadian Writing Research Collaboratory, which is producing an online repository and research environment for literary studies in and about Canada. Wayne Chapman is Professor of English at Clemson University, editor of Th e South Carolina Review, and executive editor of Clemson University Digital Press. His most recent book is Yeats’s Poetry in the Making: “Sing Whatever Is Well Made” (Palgrave Macmillan 2010). With Janet M. Manson, he is the co-author of An Annotated Guide to the Writings and Papers of Leonard Woolf (2006) and co-editor of Women in the Milieu of Leonard and Virginia Woolf: Peace, Politics, and Education (1998). Patricia Clements is founding director of Th e Orlando Project and co-editor of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (2006). She is also co-editor of The Feminist Companion to Literature in English (1990) and Virginia Woolf: New Critical Essays (1983), and author of Baudelaire and the English Tradition (1985). Her memoir is printed in Not Drowning but Waving: Women, Feminism, and the Liberal Arts (2011). She is Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of Arts at the University of Alberta, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and recipient of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. Kimberly Engdahl Coates is Associate Professor of English at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. Her work has appeared in Literature and Medicine, Journal of Narrative Theory, PsyArt and elsewhere. Most recently, her essay “Phantoms, Fancy(And) Symptoms: Virginia Woolf and The Art of Being Ill,” appeared in the 2012 issue of Woolf Studies Annual. She is currently working on a project tentatively titled ‘Come See My War’: Feminism, Politics, and the Performance of Affect in British and American Women’s Literature, 1900-1945. Melba Cuddy-Keane is Emerita Professor, University of Toronto-Scarborough, and Emerita Member of the University of Toronto’s Graduate Department of English. Her publications on Virginia Woolf include Virginia Woolf, the Intellectual, and the Public Sphere (CUP 2003) and the Harcourt annotated edition of Between the Acts (2008). Her collaborative book Modernism: Keywords (Wiley-Blackwell) will be published in 2013. Madelyn Detloff is Associate Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Miami University. She is author of Th e Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the 20th Century (2009) and co-editor of Virginia Woolf: Art, Education, and Internationalism (with Diana Royer), as well as several articles on Woolf, queer theory, feminist studies, and modernism. Jeanne Dubino is Professor of English and Global Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. She most recently published the edited volume Virginia Woolf and the Literary Marketplace (Palgrave Macmillan 2010). Sarah Dunlap is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the Ohio State University, where she studies modernist literature and ecocriticism. Her essay is derived from her dissertation research on ecological ideas in modernist fiction. J. Ashley Foster is currently a Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, City University of New York, where she is writing her dissertation “Modernism’s Impossible Witness: Peace Testimony from the Modernist Wars.” Her research interests include Peace Studies, Modernism, Ethics, the Spanish Civil War, and Women’s Studies. Jane de Gay is Reader in English Literature at Leeds Trinity University (UK). She is the author of Virginia Woolf’s Novels and the Literary Past (Edinburgh University Press/Columbia University Press 2006), as well as several articles and book chapters on Woolf. She delivered the Virginia Woolf Birthday Lecture for 2009. Diane F. Gillespie, Professor Emeritus of English (Washington State University), is author of The Sisters’ Arts and numerous essays, including most recently chapters for Maggie Humm’s Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts and Helen Southworth’s The Hogarth Press and the Networks of Modernism. She edited Woolf ’s Roger Fry and The Multiple Muses of Virginia Woolf and co-edited Julia Stephen’s writings, Virginia Woolf and the Arts (selected papers), and Cicely Hamilton’s Diana of Dobson’s. Jane Goldman is Reader in English Literature at the University of Glasgow and author of a number of works on Woolf and on modernism. She is a General Editor of the Cambridge University Press Edition of the Works of Virginia Woolf. Elizabeth Willson Gordon is Assistant Professor at King’s University. She has published on Woolf, the Hogarth Press, E. McKnight Kauffer, and Sylvia Plath. She is currently at work on a literary and cultural history of the Hogarth Press 1917-2017, as well as a collaborative digital endeavor, the Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP). Isobel Grundy, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, was until 2003 Henry Marshall Tory Professor at the University of Alberta and is now Professor Emeritus. She is co-editor of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (2006) and The Feminist Companion to Literature in English (1990). She is author of Lady MaryWortley Montagu: Comet of the Enlightenment (1999) and Samuel Johnson and the Scale of Greatness (1986). Leslie Kathleen Hankins is the President of the International Virginia Woolf Society, and a professor in the department of English and Creative Writing at Cornell College, Iowa. Recent papers on Virginia Woolf and the cinema have been published in the Modern Language Association Approaches to Teaching Virginia Woolf ’s Mrs. Dalloway, The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts, The Gender Complex of Modernism, and Woolf Studies Annual. Kathryn Holland teaches English at MacEwan University. Her research interests include synchronic approaches to modernism, modernist literature and visual arts, and late-Victorian and modernist feminist networks. Her work has been published in Modernism/Modernity, Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, and the Times Literary Supplement. She was recently Fleur Cowles Endowment Fellow at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin; she completed her DPhil at the University of Oxford. Catherine W. Hollis, Ph.D., teaches writing and literature through U.C. Berkeley’s Fall Program for Freshmen and is the author of Leslie Stephen as Mountaineer (Cecil Woolf 2010). She blogs about climbing in Leslie Stephen’s footsteps at: Michael J. Horacki is completing his Ph.D. in English at the University of Saskatchewan. He is currently working on a dissertation that utilizes emergence and assemblage theory to examine the relationships between memory, collective memory, and history in the fiction of Virginia Woolf, Evelyn Waugh, and George Orwell. Maggie Humm is an Emeritus Professor, School of Arts and Digital Industries, University of East London. Her recent publications on Woolf include Snapshots of Bloomsbury: the Private Lives of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell (Rutgers UP and the Tate 2006), The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts (Edinburgh and Columbia UP 2010), chapters in Cambridge Companions, Virginia Woolf ’s Bloomsbury, Contradictory Woolf, and articles in the Virginia Woolf Miscellany. She is currently writing about the Polish artist Joanna Rajkowska for Zero Books, and researching the connections between Mai Zetterling, Simone de Beauvoir, and Virginia Woolf. Alice Keane is a Ph.D. candidate in English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is currently completing a dissertation on Bloomsbury’s literature and economics. Marie Lovrod is Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies and Assistant Professor of English at the University of Saskatchewan. Her research focuses on intersectional constructions of gender, youth and aging, in relation to commodified employment markets. She values communities of practice that respect research, learning, and social environments as inclusive spaces. Aurelea Mahood teaches English at Capilano University and coordinates the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’s Liberal Studies BA. Her teaching and research interests include the intersection between the historical and digital avant-garde. Current research projects build on her recent article, “Drink Me: Student Audiences, the Construction of Value, and the Digital Avant-Garde,” published in Media : Pedagogy : Culture (2011), which examined the adventures and pitfalls of teaching an undergraduate course on electronic literature and digital poetry. Her last book-length project was Modernism: An Introduction (EUP 2007). She is also the current web editor for The Capilano Review. Ann Martin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan, and was lead organizer of Interdisciplinary / Multidisciplinary Woolf. Her scholarly publications include Red Riding Hood and the Wolf in Bed: Modernism’s Fairy Tales (UTP 2006) and articles on Djuna Barnes, Emma Donoghue, J. G. Sims, and Virginia Woolf. She is currently researching the place of the motor-car in interwar British literature. Eleanor McNees is an associate dean and professor of English at the University of Denver. Her research interests focus on Woolf and her Victorian predecessors. She is editor of Critical Assessments of Virginia Woolf and annotated The Years for the new Harcourt series. Vara Neverow, a professor of English and Women’s Studies at Southern Connecticut State University, has written the Introduction and annotations for Jacob’s Room (Harcourt 2008), “Virginia Woolf and City Aesthetics” (Humm, Virginia Woolf and the Arts 2010), “Woolf’s Editorial Self-Censorship and Risk-Taking in Jacob’s Room” (Dubino, Virginia Woolf and the Literary Marketplace 2010), and “Echo Chambers of War in A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas” (Wood, The Theme of Peace and War in Virginia Woolf's Writings 2010). Lolly J. Ockerstrom is an Associate Professor of English at Park University in northwest Missouri, where she teaches writing and English literature. Her most recent publication is Virginia Woolf and the Spanish Civil War: Texts, Contexts, and Women’s Narratives, published by Cecil Woolf Publishers. Maria Aparecida de Oliveira has just completed her Ph.D. at Unesp. She was a visiting scholar at the University of Winnipeg, thanks to a scholarship from Capes Foundation. Her current research is on “The Female Representation in Virginia Woolf’s Works: A Dialogue between the Political and the Aesthetic Discourse.” She has also participated in the 2011 Virginia Woolf conference in Glasgow. Charlie Peters is a theater artist from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. He recently completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Acting at the University of Saskatchewan. He has directed works as diverse as Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Rossini’s The Barber of Seville, Willimon’s Farragut North, and plays by Saskatchewan artists. His poetry has been published in The Fieldstone Review and Windscript. His works for the stage have been produced at the Saskatoon Fringe Festival and by the Saskatoon Opera. Steven D. Putzel teaches at the Pennsylvania State University, Wilkes-Barre campus. He is the author of Reconstructing Yeats, and numerous essays on W. B. Yeats, Sam Shepard, James Joyce, Paul Muldoon, Sheila Watson, and Woolf. His most recent work is Virginia Woolf and the Theater (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press 2012). Conor Tomás Reed is an activist, student, and educator with the City University of New York and Free University. Conor’s work explores narratives and archives of revolts; Africana literary and social movements; and the politics of cultural ownership and theft. Kyle Robertson graduated in May 2012 from the English honours program at the University of British Columbia. He lives in Vancouver and culture jams at Adbusters between freelance work as a writer and web developer. Contact him by email: kyle@robow.ca Brenda R. Silver is Mary Brinsmead Wheelock Professor Emerita at Dartmouth College and Adjunct Professor of English at Trinity College Dublin. Publications include Virginia Woolf Icon, Virginia Woolf ’s Reading Notebooks, and, with Lynn Higgins, Rape and Representation; articles on Charlotte Brontë, E.M. Forster, hypertext, popular fiction in the digital age; and numerous essays on Virginia Woolf. Elisa Kay Sparks has been teaching in the English Department at Clemson since 1978. Since 1993 she has focused on studying Virginia Woolf, publishing numerous papers on the relationship between Woolf and the American painter Georgia O’Keeffe, as well as on gardens in Woolf’s life and work, and is halfway through a book on flower imagery in Woolf. She is also a printmaker, specializing in color-reduction woodcuts, often of subjects related to Woolf and O’Keeffe. Kathleen Wall is Professor of English at the University of Regina, where her teaching and research interests include feminist theory, new formalism, and aesthetics. Her most recent publication on Woolf is “Significant Form in Jacob’s Room: Ekphrasis and the Elegy,” which was included in the Norton Critical Edition. She has nearly finished a study that considers how Woolf’s formal practice, one that maintains the autonomy of art (a concept supported by her knowledge of Roger Fry’s formalism) demands the reader’s critical engagement with what Gregory Jusdanis describes as “a sovereign space…from which to reflect on society.” With roots in Saskatchewan and New Brunswick, Dr. Karen Wood is a researcher and clinician in Saskatchewan. Incorporating feminist analysis with an interdisciplinary background in social work, education, and health, Karen’s research explores the complexity of healing from the impact of the residential school system and child sexual abuse.

Abridged contributor list: Adam Barrows is an Associate Professor in the English department at Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario. He is the author of The Cosmic Time of Empire: Modern Britain and World Literature (University of California Press 2011) and a recipient of the Modern Fiction Studies Margaret Church Memorial Prize. Claire Battershill is a Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at the Ontario College of Art and Design University. Sarah Blake is an artist born in Wales in 1983. She studied English Literature at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and has an M.A. in Art and Design (Studio Practice) from Loughborough University. Marlene A. Briggs is Assistant Professor of English at the University of British Columbia, teaching twentieth-century literature. Christopher Brown teaches at Cal Poly Pomona and Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, California. Susan Brown is Professor of English at the University of Guelph and Visiting Professor at the University of Alberta. She is co-editor (with Patricia Clements and Isobel Grundy) of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (Cambridge UP 2006 Wayne Chapman is Professor of English at Clemson University, editor of The South Carolina Review, and executive editor of Clemson University Press. His most recent book is Yeats’s Poetry in the Making: “Sing Whatever Is Well Made” (Palgrave Macmillan 2010). Patricia Clements is Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of Arts at the University of Alberta, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and recipient of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. She is founding director of The Orlando Project and co-editor of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (2006). She is also co-editor of The Feminist Companion to Literature in English (1990) and Virginia Woolf: New Critical Essays (1983), and author of Baudelaire and the English Tradition (1985). Melba Cuddy-Keane is Emerita Professor, University of Toronto-Scarborough, and Emerita Member of the University of Toronto’s Graduate Department of English. Her publications on Virginia Woolf include Virginia Woolf, the Intellectual, and the Public Sphere (CUP 2003) and the Harcourt annotated edition of Between the Acts (2008). Madelyn Detloff is Associate Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Miami University. She is author of The Persistence of Modernism: Loss and Mourning in the 20th Century (CUP, 2009). Jeanne Dubino is Professor of English and Global Studies at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. She most recently published the edited volume Virginia Woolf and the Literary Marketplace (Palgrave Macmillan 2010). Sarah Dunlap is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the Ohio State University, where she studies modernist literature and ecocriticism. J. Ashley Foster is currently a Ph.D. candidate at The Graduate Center, City University of New York. Jane de Gay is Reader in English Literature at Leeds Trinity University (UK). She is the author of Virginia Woolf’s Novels and the Literary Past (Edinburgh University Press. She delivered the Virginia Woolf Birthday Lecture for 2009. Diane F. Gillespie is Professor Emeritus of English at Washington State University. Jane Goldman is Reader in English Literature at the University of Glasgow and a General Editor of the Cambridge University Press Edition of the Works of Virginia Woolf. Elizabeth Willson Gordon is Assistant Professor at King’s University. Isobel Grundy, Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, was until 2003 Henry Marshall Tory Professor at the University of Alberta and is now Professor Emeritus. She is co-editor of Orlando: Women’s Writing in the British Isles from the Beginnings to the Present (2006) and The Feminist Companion to Literature in English (1990). Leslie Kathleen Hankins is the President of the International Virginia Woolf Society, and a professor in the department of English and Creative Writing at Cornell College, Iowa. Kathryn Holland teaches English at MacEwan University and was recently Fleur Cowles Endowment Fellow at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. Catherine W. Hollis, Ph.D., teaches writing and literature through U.C. Berkeley’s Fall Program for Freshmen. Michael J. Horacki is completing his Ph.D. in English at the University of Saskatchewan. Maggie Humm is an Emeritus Professor in the School of Arts and Digital Industries at the University of East London. Her recent publications on Woolf include Snapshots of Bloomsbury: the Private Lives of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell (Rutgers UP and the Tate 2006), The Edinburgh Companion to Virginia Woolf and the Arts (Edinburgh and Columbia UP 2010). Alice Keane is a Ph.D. candidate in English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Marie Lovrod is Coordinator of Women’s and Gender Studies and Assistant Professor of English at the University of Saskatchewan. Aurelea Mahood teaches English at Capilano University and coordinates the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’s Liberal Studies BA. She is author of Modernism: An Introduction (EUP 2007). Ann Martin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at the University of Saskatchewan. Her scholarly publications include Red Riding Hood and the Wolf in Bed: Modernism’s Fairy Tales (UTP 2006). Eleanor McNees is an associate dean and professor of English at the University of Denver. She is editor of Critical Assessments of Virginia Woolf and annotated The Years for the new Harcourt series. Vara Neverow is professor of English and Women’s Studies at Southern Connecticut State University. Lolly J. Ockerstrom is an Associate Professor of English at Park University in northwest Missouri, where she teaches writing and English literature. Maria Aparecida de Oliveira has just completed her Ph.D. at Unesp. Charlie Peters is a theater artist from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. His poetry has been published in The Fieldstone Review and Windscript. His works for the stage have been produced at the Saskatoon Fringe Festival and by the Saskatoon Opera. Steven D. Putzel teaches at the Pennsylvania State University, Wilkes-Barre campus. He is the author of Reconstructing Yeats, and Virginia Woolf and the Theater (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press 2012). Conor Tomás Reed is an activist, student, and educator with the City University of New York and Free University. Kyle Robertson graduated in May 2012 from the English honours program at the University of British Columbia. Brenda R. Silver is Mary Brinsmead Wheelock Professor Emerita at Dartmouth College and Adjunct Professor of English at Trinity College Dublin. Publications include Virginia Woolf Icon, and Virginia Woolf’s Reading Notebooks. Elisa Kay Sparks teaches in the English Department at Clemson University. Kathleen Wall is Professor of English at the University of Regina, where her teaching and research interests include feminist theory, new formalism, and aesthetics. Her most recent publication on Woolf is “Significant Form in Jacob’s Room: Ekphrasis and the Elegy,” which was included in the Norton Critical Edition. Dr. Karen Wood is a researcher and clinician in Saskatchewan. Incorporating feminist analysis with an interdisciplinary background in social work, education, and health, Karen’s research explores the complexity of healing from the impact of the residential school system and child sexual abuse.

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About The Author

Ann R. C. Martin is Assistant Professor at the University of Saskatchewan. Kathryn Holland is Professor in the English Department at MacEwan University.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
Cover 1
Contents6
Introduction 8
Acknowledgments 15
Abbreviations 16
History, Materiality, Multiplicity18
Multidisciplinary Woolf/Multiple Woolf? 19
Woolf, History, Us 30
“Full of Experiments and Reforms”: Virginia Woolf, John Maynard Keynes, and the Impossibility of Economic Modeling 37
Desiring Statues and Ambiguous Sexualities in Jacob’s Room 44
Challenging the Family Script: Woolf, the Stephen Family, and Victorian Evangelical Theology52
History as Scaffolding: Woolf ’s Use of The Times in The Years58
Vincent van Gogh, Virginia Woolf, and Old Shoes: A Cross-Cultural Iconography of Historical Truama from the Great War to the Iraq War67
Stopped at the Border: Virginia Woolf and the Criminalization of Dissent in Democratic Societies 74
“Q. And babies? A. And babies”: On Pacifiism, Visual Truama, and the Body Heap85
Photography, History, and Memoir of the Spanish Civil War: Interdisciplinary Views 90
Patterns, Practices, Principles96
“Waving to Virginia” 97
Woolf, Defoe, Derrida: Interdisciplinary dogs—or the canine aesthetics and (gender) politics of creativity 112
“The law is on the side of the normal”: Virginia Woolf as Crip Theorist119
A Healing Centre of One’s Own: Woolf's Legacy and Public Responses to Child Abuse126
Sunflower Suture: Disseminating the Garden in The Years136
“One Must Be Scientific": Natural History and Ecology in Mrs. Dalloway144
Clarissa’s Glacial Skepticism: John Tyndall and “Deep Time” in Mrs. Dalloway 149
Apollonian Illusion and Dionysian Truth in Mrs. Dalloway 155
Art, Influence, Embodiment 160
Time has whizzed back an inch or two on its reel”: Relating Virginia Woolf and Emily Carr through Vintage Postcards, Lily Broscoe, Mrs. McNab, and the Cinematic Time of To the Lighthouse 161
Speaking Citizen to Citizen in a Time of War: Miss La Trobe’s Use of Parabasis in her Historical Pageant 181
Work as Salvation: Eureka’s Angel in the House, A Dircetor’s Experience 188
Drawing as Thinking: A Visual Response to To the Lighthouse194
Performing Feminism, Transmitting Affect: Isadora Duncan, Virginia Woolf, and the Politics of Movement200
Virginia Woolf and Clarice Lispector: Thinking Back Through Brazilian Mothers207
Mystical Gibberish or Renegade Discourse?: Poetic Language According to Orlando 213
Selves and Others as Narrative Participants in Woolf's Novels218
Publishing, Politics, Publics224
“The most unaccountable of machinery” : The Orlando Project produces a textbase of one’s own225
The Hotel at the End of the Universe242
Globalization, Inter Connectivity, and Anti-Imperialism: Leonard Woolf, the Hogarth Press, and Kenya 248
Chinese Eyes and Muddled Armenians: The Hogarth Press and British Racial Discourse254
“No One Wants Biography”: The Hogarth Press Classifies Orlando260
There Goes the Bride: Virginia Woolf, Julia Strachey, and the Hogarth Press264
Redefining Woolf for the 1990s: Producing and Promoting The “Definitive Collected Edition”273
The Believers: Writers Publishing for Readers, Or Preliminary Musings on The Hogarth Press and McSweeney’s279
The Woolfs in Print and Online: A University Press in Transition286
Notes on Contributors298
Conference Program 303