Stonehenge Aerodrome and the Stonehenge Landscape

BookStonehenge Aerodrome and the Stonehenge Landscape

Stonehenge Aerodrome and the Stonehenge Landscape

Stonehenge World Heritage Site Landscape Project

Research Reports

2014

June 15th, 2014

£30.00

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Description

Between 1917 and 1921, Stonehenge had an aerodrome for a near-neighbour. Initially a Royal Flying Corps training establishment, from January 1918 it became the number one School of Aerial Navigation and Bomb Dropping, home to a contingent of RNAS Handley Page bombers. The aerodrome featured two camps either side of a take-off and landing ground, the first located close to Fargo Plantation, and a subsequent and more substantial technical and domestic site situated either side of what is now the A303, a few hundred yards west of Stonehenge. After the war, the aerodrome buildings became the focus of debate about what constituted unacceptable modern intrusions in the Stonehenge landscape. Following a public appeal the aerodrome and neighbouring farmland was purchased, the buildings dismantled and removed and thus the Stonehenge landscape was restored to something deemed more appropriate as a setting the for the monument.

Author Information

Martyn Barber is a Senior Investigator, Aerial Survey & Investigation at English Heritage. He is the author of Bronze and the Bronze Age (2003), and co-author of The Neolithic Flint Mines of England (1999) and The Creation of Monuments (2001).

Table of Contents

Section TitlePage
1. Introduction 2. Stonehenge aerodrome and the Stonehenge landscape - an overview 3. Fargo Cottages 4. Stonehenge aerodrome: background and origins 5. Use of the aerodrome 1917-1922 6. The development of the aerodrome 7. The aerodrome and archaeology - dameage to earthworks 8. Sale, auction and demolition 1918-1939 9. The disappearance of the aerodrome 10. Did the Royal Flying Corps - or anyone else - Really want to knock down Stonehenge? 11. Freeing the circle Bibliography