Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 27

BookPolin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 27

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry Volume 27

Jews in the Kingdom of Poland, 1815-1918

Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry

2014

November 14th, 2014

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The Kingdom of Poland, also known as the Congress Kingdom or Russian Poland, was created by a decision of the Congress of Vienna as part of its attempt to set up a post-Napoleonic European order. It incorporated lands that for many decades had been the most important centres of Polish politics, finance, education, and culture, and which also had the largest concentration of Jews in eastern Europe. Because of these factors, and because its semi-autonomous status allowed for the development of a liberal policy towards Jews quite different from that of Russia proper, the Kingdom of Poland became a fertile ground for the growth of Jewish cultural and political movements of all sorts, many of which continue to be influential to this day. This volume brings together a wide range of scholars to present a broad view of the Jewish life of this important area at a critical moment in its history. In the nineteenth century, tradition vied with modernization for Jews’ hearts and minds. In the Kingdom of Poland, traditional hasidic leaders defied the logic of modernization by creating courts near major urban centres such as Warsaw and Łódź and shtiblekh within them, producing innovative and influential homiletic literature and attracting new followers. Modernizing maskilim, for their part, found employment as government officials and took advantage of the liberal climate to establish educational institutions and periodicals that similarly attracted followers to their own cause and influenced the development of the Jewish community in the Kingdom in a completely different direction. Their immediate successors, the Jewish integrationists, managed to gain considerable power within the Jewish community and to create a vibrant and more secular Polish Jewish culture. Subsequently Zionism, Jewish socialism, and cultural autonomy also became significant forces. The relative strength of each movement on the eve of the rebirth of Poland is extremely difficult to measure, but unquestionably the ferment of so many potent, competing movements was a critical factor in shaping the modern Jewish experience.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
00LITPOL27i-xivPrelsOP.pdf2
01LITPOL27001-044DynnerWodzOP16
02LITPOL27045-062B-PawlikowskiOP60
03LITPOL27063-088OniszczukOP78
04LITPOL27089-116JagodzinskaOP104
05LITPOL27117-152GuesnetOP132
06LITPOL27153-180KanferOP168
07LITPOL27181-218RudnickiOP196
08LITPOL27219-256MarkowskiOP234
09LITPOL27257-272MatisOP272
10LITPOL27273-304N-KulikovOP288
11LITPOL27305-320WeeksOP320
12LITPOL27321-334ZimmermanOP336
13LITPOL27335-366SilberOP350
14LITPOL27367-384ZalashikOP382
15LITPOL27385-398PiotrowskiOP400
16LITPOL27399-412SulekOP414
17LITPOL27413-426CioffiOP428
18LITPOL27427-442FinderOP442
19LITPOL27443-448TellerOP458
20LITPOL27449-458BrownOP464
21LITPOL27459-464FreezeOP474
22LITPOL27465-474FreilichOP480
23LITPOL27475-478FitelbergOP490
24LITPOL27479-484MeduckaOP494
25LITPOL27485-488ContribsOP500
26LITPOL27489-498IndexOP504