The Chronicle of Ireland

BookThe Chronicle of Ireland

The Chronicle of Ireland

Translated Texts for Historians, 44

2006

May 1st, 2006

£80.00
£39.95

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The Chronicle of Ireland is the principal source for the history of events not only in Ireland itself but also in what is now Scotland up to 911. It incorporated annals compiled on Iona up to c. 740 – a monastery which played a major role in the history of Ireland, of the Picts to its east and, from 635 to 664, of Northumbria. Up to c. 740 the Chronicle is thus a crucial source for both Ireland and Britain; and from c. 740 to 911 it still records some events outside Ireland. The text of the Chronicle is best preserved in the Annals of Ulster, but it was also transmitted through chronicles derived from a version made at the monastery of Clonmacnois in the Irish midlands. This translation is set out so as to show at a glance what text is preserved in both branches of the tradition and what is in only one.

The Chronicle of Ireland, then is in many respects a very important addition to scholarship on the Irish annals. It will enable people to utilise the chronicles before 912 in a more effective way, since much of Charles-Edwards's knowledge and research on the early medieval British Isles, Ireland in particular, are reflected in this work. ...This new publication will be excellent as a means of introducing the Irish chronicle to students of Irish and Scottish history.
The Innes Review

About The Author

T. M. Charles-Edwards (born 1943) was Jesus Professor of Celtic, University of Oxford. He was a Scholar of the School of Celtic Studies in the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2001 and an Honorary Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2006. He retired in 2011. His main publications include 'The Early Christian Ireland' (Cambridge, 2000); 'The Chronicle of Ireland', Translated Texts for Historians, 44 (Liverpool, 2006); 'Corpus Christi College, Oxford: A History' (Oxford, 2017).