Exploiting the Sea

BookExploiting the Sea

Exploiting the Sea

Aspects of Britain's Maritime Economy since 1870

Exeter Maritime Studies

1998

May 1st, 1998

£20.00

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Exploiting the Sea offers new perspectives on Britain's vital but changing relationship with the sea since the late nineteenth century. It assesses the significance to the British economy of sea-reliant industries such as shipping, shipbuilding, fishing, coastal trading and seaside tourism. It also seeks to explain why the clear pre-eminence that Britain established in the maritime world during the Victorian era has not been sustained in the twentieth century. Exploiting the Sea is a new volume in the highly successful series Exeter Maritime Studies, and brings together contributions from experts writing in their own specialist fields to give a wide-ranging but structured analytical approach to a misunderstood subject.

Alan G. Jamieson is Leverhulme Research Fellow in British Maritime History in the Centre for Maritime Historical Studies, University of Exeter. David J Starkey graduated from the University of Leeds with a degree in Economic History. He then gained an MA in the History of the Atlantic Economy at the University of Exeter, which led to doctoral research into the character, scale and significance of British privateering in the eighteenth century. Having gained his PhD, Dr Starkey was appointed Research Fellow in the Maritime History of Devon project at the University of Exeter, an appointment that was followed by two further research fellowships in maritime history at Exeter. In 1994, Dr Starkey joined the History Department at Hull when he became the holder of the first permanent lectureship to be dedicated to maritime historical studies in the UK university sector - the Wilson Family Lectureship in Maritime History. Dr Starkey is Director of the Maritime Historical Studies Centre at the University of Hull.

List of Contributors Alan G. Jamieson (By (author)) (id 2398) David J. Starkey (By (author)) (id 2399) John Armstrong (Contributions by) (id 2400) Janet Cusack (Contributions by) (id 2401) Brian Dyson (Contributions by) (id 2402) Andrew Gordon (Contributions by) (id 2403) Anthony Gorst (Contributions by) (id 2404) Alan G. Jamieson (Contributions by) (id 2405) Lewis Johnman (Contributions by) (id 2406) Nigel J. Morgan (Contributions by) (id 2407) Sidney Pollard (Contributions by) (id 2408) Robb Robinson (Contributions by) (id 2409) David J. Starkey (Contributions by) (id 2410)

The strength of these papers lies in their breadth. They are well written and researched pieces, and there will be few maritime historians who won't find something new and interesting amongst these studies.

The Great Circle, Vol. 23, No. 2

A fascinating history that contains many lessons for those currently involved in the maritime industries.

Asia Pacific Shipping

A fascinating history that contains many lessons for those currently involved in the maritime industries.

Work Boat World Magazine

A collection that considers a very wide range of the functional aspects of Britain's relative and absolute maritime decline.

International Journal of Maritime History

Within the confines of 220 pages these studies provide a concise and valuable insight into some of the economic, political and social forces that have helped to reduce Britain’s former maritime pre-eminence . . . recommended to all who would wish to widen their nautical horizons.

The Mariner’s Mirror

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About The Author

David J Starkey is Professor of Maritime History and Director of the Maritime Historical Studies Centre at the University of Hull. Alan G. Jamieson is Leverhulme Research Fellow in British Maritime History in the Centre for Maritime Historical Studies, University of Exeter.