The Roman Hannibal

BookThe Roman Hannibal

The Roman Hannibal

Remembering the Enemy in Silius Italicus’ Punica

2014

April 15th, 2014

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Silius Italicus’ Punica, the longest surviving epic in Latin literature, has seen a resurgence of interest among scholars in recent years. A celebration of Rome’s triumph over Hannibal and Carthage during the second Punic war, Silius’ poem presents a plethora of familiar names to its readers: Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus, Scipio Africanus and, of course, Rome’s ‘ultimate enemy’ – Hannibal. Where most recent scholarship on the Punica has focused its attention of the problematic portrayal of Scipio Africanus as a hero for Rome, this book shifts the focus to Carthage and offers a new reading of Hannibal’s place in Silius’ epic, and in Rome’s literary culture at large. Celebrated and demonised in equal measure, Hannibal became something of an anti-hero for Rome; a man who acquired mythic status, and was condemned by Rome’s authors for his supposed greed and cruelty, yet admired for his military acumen. For the first time this book provides a comprehensive overview of this multi-faceted Hannibal as he appears in the Punica and suggests that Silius’ portrayal of him can be read as the culmination to Rome’s centuries-long engagement with the Carthaginian in its literature. Through detailed consideration of internal focalisation, Silius’ Hannibal is revealed to be a man striving to create an eternal legacy, becoming the Hannibal whom a Roman, and a modern reader, would recognise. The works of Polybius, Livy, Virgil, and the post Virgilian epicists all have a bit-part in this book, which aims to show that Silius Italicus’ Punica is as much an example of how Rome remembered its past, as it is a text striving to join Rome’s epic canon.

1. New reading of the character of Hannibal in Silius Italicus’ Punica. 2. First published book-length discussion in English on Hannibal in the Punica. 3. Offers new insight into how Rome remembered its past. 4. First detailed discussion on Hannibal as a cultural icon in Rome’s literature. 5. Re-evaluation of the Punica as a text that combines historiographic and epic traditions.

Silius Italicus’ Punica, the longest surviving epic in Latin literature, has seen a resurgence of interest among scholars in recent years. A celebration of Rome’s triumph over Hannibal and Carthage during the second Punic war, Silius’ poem presents a plethora of familiar names to its readers: Fabius Maximus, Claudius Marcellus, Scipio Africanus and, of course, Rome’s ‘ultimate enemy’ – Hannibal. Where most recent scholarship on the Punica has focused its attention of the problematic portrayal of Scipio Africanus as a hero for Rome, this book shifts the focus to Carthage and offers a new reading of Hannibal’s place in Silius’ epic, and in Rome’s literary culture at large. Celebrated and demonised in equal measure, Hannibal became something of an anti-hero for Rome; a man who acquired mythic status, and was condemned by Rome’s authors for his supposed greed and cruelty, yet admired for his military acumen. For the first time this book provides a comprehensive overview of this multi-faceted Hannibal as he appears in the Punica and suggests that Silius’ portrayal of him can be read as the culmination to Rome’s centuries-long engagement with the Carthaginian in its literature. Through detailed consideration of internal focalisation, Silius’ Hannibal is revealed to be a man striving to create an eternal legacy, becoming the Hannibal whom a Roman, and a modern reader, would recognise. The works of Polybius, Livy, Virgil, and the post Virgilian epicists all have a bit-part in this book, which aims to show that Silius Italicus’ Punica is as much an example of how Rome remembered its past, as it is a text striving to join Rome’s epic canon.

Claire Stocks is Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin Language and Culture at Radboud University, Nijmegen.

'This book offers many stimulating discussions of the multi-faceted Punica and paves the way for monographs on some of the other figures of Silius' epic world (Fabius, Paulus, Marcellus).'
Anthony Augoustakis, Classical Journal

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/9781781380284?cc=us

About The Author

Dr Claire Stocks is currently Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin Language and Culture at Radboud University, Nijmegen. She was previously Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History, University of Manchester and Supervisor of Studies and Bye-fellow for Classics, Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
Cover1
Half-title2
Title page4
Copyright page5
Contents6
Acknowledgements10
Texts and Translations Used12
Introduction14
Chapter 119
Chapter 1.119
Chapter 1.222
Chapter 1.324
Chapter 226
Chapter 2.126
Chapter 2.229
Chapter 2.334
Chapter 348
Chapter 3.148
Chapter 3.249
Chapter 3.359
Chapter 466
Chapter 4.166
Chapter 4.288
Chapter 593
Chapter 5.195
Chapter 5.2101
Chapter 5.3109
Chapter 6116
Chapter 6.1116
Chapter 6.2121
Chapter 6.3126
Chapter 6.4127
Chapter 6.5135
Chapter 6.6139
Chapter 7146
Chapter 7.1147
Chapter 7.2151
Chapter 7.3153
Chapter 7.4156
Chapter 8160
Chapter 8.1160
Chapter 8.2163
Chapter 8.3165
Chapter 8.4169
Chapter 8.5175
Chapter 9180
Chapter 9.1180
Chapter 9.2183
Chapter 9.3187
Chapter 9.4191
Chapter 10195
Chapter 10.1195
Chapter 10.2198
Chapter 10.3199
Chapter 10.4210
Chapter 10.5221
Chapter 11231
Chapter 11.1231
Chapter 11.2234
Chapter 11.3236
Chapter 11.4240
Conclusion244
Bibliography248
General Index268
Index locorum275