The Sense of Community in French Caribbean Fiction

BookThe Sense of Community in French Caribbean Fiction

The Sense of Community in French Caribbean Fiction

Contemporary French and Francophone Cultures, 10

2008

July 1st, 2008

Access Token
£16.99
£16.99

Details

Other Formats

Price

Description

This book analyses the theme of community in seven French Caribbean novels in relation to the work of the French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy. The islands’ complex history means that community is a central and problematic issue in their literature, and underlies a range of other questions such as political agency, individual and collective subjectivity, attitudes towards the past and the future, and even literary form itself. Britton examines Jacques Roumain’s Gouverneurs de la rosée, Edouard Glissant’s Le Quatrième Siècle, Simone Schwarz-Bart’s Pluie et vent sur Télumée Miracle, Vincent Placoly’s L’eau-de-mort guildive, Patrick Chamoiseau’s Texaco, Daniel Maximin’s L’Ile et une nuit and Maryse Condé’s Desirada.

Truly one of the finest pieces of literary and theoretical analysis to date in Postcolonial French Studies.

Celia Britton's new book provides an approach that avoids the binary trap of identity and alterity. [...] A rich and diverse range of conceptions of community emerges from Britton's readings.
TLS

Britton's book is a thoughtful and valuable contribution to discussions both of [French philosopher Jean-Luc ] Nancy's work and about community in the French Caribbean; it will certainly become a touchstone for scholars in the field.
Modern Language Review, 104.3

At a time when francophone postcolonial studies appears to be seeking a second wind, this book by Professor Britton (and indeed the Liverpool University Press collection within which it figures) would seem to be offering an exemplary pathway out of the current impasse. This is a book that demonstrates how a serious engagement with theory from another discipline can enrich and re-vitalize the field of postcolonial literary study.
French Studies, Vol. 64 No. 10

Celia Britton's latest book is a finely-crafted piece of writing that deserves a readership far beyond the relatively narrow community of French Caribbean scholars for whom one might assume it was intended ... At a time when francophone postcolonial studies appears to be seeking a second wind, this book by Professor Britton (and indeed the Liverpool University Press collection within which it figures) would seem to be offering an exemplary pathway out of the current impasse. This is a book that demonstrates how a serious engagement with theory from another discipline can enrich and re-vitalize the field of postcolonial literary study.
French Studies 64 (1)

https://global.oup.com/academic/product/9781846315008?cc=us

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Section TitlePagePrice
Half-title1
Title3
Copyright4
Acknowledgements5
Abbreviations6
Introduction8
1 Restoring Lost Unity in Jacques Roumain’s Gouverneurs de la rosée26
2 Past, Future and the Maroon Community in Edouard Glissant’s Le Quatrième Siècle43
3 Living by Mistake: Individual and Community in Simone Schwarz-Bart’s Pluie et vent sur Télumée Miracle62
4 Singular Beings and Political Disorganization in Vincent Placoly’s L’Eau-de-mort guildive81
5 Conquering the Town: Stories and Myth in Patrick Chamoiseau’s Texaco100
6 Community, Nature and Solitude in Daniel Maximin’s L’Ile et une nuit118
7 On Not Belonging: Surrogate Families and Marginalized Communities in Maryse Condé’s Desirada138
Conclusion158
Notes168
Bibliography188
Index194