Sculpture Journal

The Scutari Monument in Istanbul: the introduction of Victorian monumental language to Ottoman society

Sculpture Journal (2014), 23, (3), 279–292.

Abstract

The Crimean War ended in 1856 with the Treaty of Paris. The Ottoman Reform Edict (Islahat Fermanı), proclaimed by Sultan Abdülmecid in the same year, was acknowledged in the ninth article of that treaty. Henceforth, non-Muslims acquired the right to construct and repair their own religious buildings, schools, hospitals and cemeteries within the frontiers of the Ottoman Empire. Following the edict, the first monumental edifice constructed by Britain, one of the allies of the Ottomans in the Crimean War, was the Scutari Monument. It was erected in Haydarpaşa British Cemetery which had been established for the British war dead. This article considers the Scutari Monument and the political frameworks that afforded its erection. It considers the monument within the oeuvre of its sculptor, Baron Carlo Marochetti, and explores its wider significance in the emergence of Ottoman monumental practices.

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Author details

Sag, Kaan