Labour History Review

The Crisis in Labour History: A Further Comment

Labour History Review (1996), 61, (3), 322–328.

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Patrick Joyce, ‘The end of social history’, Social History, vol. 20, no. 1, 1995, provides a useful bibliography of the recent literature on p. 24, n. 2. ‘The end of social history’ Social History 20 Google Scholar

The discussion in Labour History Review began with an editorial signed DH [David Howell] in vol. 60, no. 1, p. 2. The debate on this editorial is in vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 46-53. Google Scholar

For this very interesting concept of the ‘by-standers’ see the article by Norman Geras, ‘Socialist hope in an age of controversy’, in L. Panitch (ed.), Socialist Register, 1996, pp. 239-63. Google Scholar

W. R. Cornish and G. de N. Clark, Law and Society in England 1750-1950, 1989; John V. Orth, Combination and Conspiracy: A Legal History of Trade Unionism, 1721-1906, 1991. Google Scholar

Daphne Simon, ‘Master and Servant’, in John Saville (ed.), Democracy and the Labour Movement, 1954, pp. 160-200. Google Scholar

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For a useful review, Times Literary Supplement, 26 July 1996. Google Scholar

I have deliberately omitted any reference to post-modernist theorising. In common with most British historians I do not regard if as of major significance to our general understanding of the past. I hope to offer a sustained critique of Patrick Joyce's latest volume in a future issue of Socialist History. Google Scholar

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Saville, John