Labour History Review

‘From gun carriage to railway carriage’: the fight for peace work at the Woolwich Arsenal 1919-22

Labour History Review (1998), 63, (3), 277–297.

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Hands Off The Nation's Royal Ordnance Factories, 1958. On this campaign see D. Weinbren and T. Putnam, A Short History of Royal Ordnance, Patricroft, Nasmyth's Bridgewater Foundry, 1995 Google Scholar

History of the Ministry of Munitions, Volume VIII, Part II, 1918-1922, p. 68 Google Scholar

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The Worker, 12 April 1919 Google Scholar

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Hinton put forward this trio in The first shop stewards movement. Google Scholar

The Worker, 12 April 1919 Google Scholar

Glasgow Herald, 21 October 1918 Google Scholar

R. Price, Labour in British Society, pp. 158-9 Google Scholar

The restoration of pre-war practices is discussed further in Clegg, A History of Trade Unionism, pp. 120-7 Google Scholar

Woolwich Pioneer, 9 January 1920 Google Scholar

T. Burke, The Outer Circle: Rambles in Remote London, 1921, p. 46 Google Scholar

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Evening Standard, 3 March 1922 Google Scholar

Woolwich Pioneer, 28 March 1919 Google Scholar

Woolwich Pioneer, 12 August 1921. The unsuccessful post First World War campaign to use Pembroke Dock for laying down merchant ships is examined in A. Day, ‘"Driven from home": the closure of Pembroke Dock and the impact on its community’, Llafur, vol. 7 no. 1 (1996), p. 84 Google Scholar

Press comment appeared in the Daily Mail, Evening Standard, the Stock Exchange Gazette and Railway and Travel Monthly. Google Scholar

History of the Ministry of Munitions, Volume VI, Part 1, p. 76. PRO MUN 4 6401 Google Scholar

G. E. Raine, The Nationalisation Peril, revised ed., 1920, pp. 71-8, 90-91 Google Scholar

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Times, 16 October 1906; 6 April 1907; 9 April 1907 Google Scholar

Woolwich Pioneer, August 1922; September 1922. See also R. Allen, ‘The battle for the common: politics and populism in mid-Victorian Kentish London’, Social History, vol. 22, no. 1 (January 1997), pp. 61-77 and A. Taylor, ‘"Commons-stealers", "land-grabbers" and "Jerry builders": politics and populism in mid-Victorian Kentish London’, International Review of Social History, vol. 40, no. 3 (December 1995), pp. 383-407 Google Scholar

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Weinbren, Dan