Labour History Review

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Labour History Review (1999), 64, (2), 200–209.

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M. Maurice, F. Sellier and J. J. Silvestre, The Social Foundations of Industrial Power, MIT Press, 1986 The Social Foundations of Industrial Power Google Scholar

Marianne A. Ferber (ed), Women in the Labor Market (The International Library of Critical Writings in Economics No. 90), Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, 1998, Vol. 1, pp. xxxiv + 563, Vol. 2, pp. xi + 617, h/b, £275.00, ISBN 1 85898 499 8 Women in the Labor Market 1 xxxiv Google Scholar

Julia Kirk Blackwelder Now Hiring. The Feminization of Work in the United States, 1900-1995, Texas A&M University Press, 1997, pp. xv + 308, h/b, $39.95, ISBN 0 89096 776 8; p/b, $17.95, ISBN 0 89096 798 9 Now Hiring. The Feminization of Work in the United States, 1900-1995 xv Google Scholar

Tera W. Hunter To 'Joy My Freedom. Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War, Harvard University Press, 1997, pp. ix + 311, h/b, £19.95, ISBN 0 674 89309 3; p/b, £9.95, ISBN 0 674 89308 5 To 'Joy My Freedom. Southern Black Women's Lives and Labors After the Civil War ix Google Scholar

Paul Burstein Discrimination, Jobs and Politics. The Struggle for Equal Employment Opportunity in the United States since the New Deal, University of Chicago Press, 1998 edition, pp. xxxv + 247, p/b, £12.75, ISBN 0 226 08136 2 Discrimination, Jobs and Politics. The Struggle for Equal Employment Opportunity in the United States since the New Deal xxxv Google Scholar

In 1996 women formed 47.8 per cent of the labour force in Sweden, 47.1 per cent in Finland, 46.6 per cent in Iceland, 45.9 per cent in Norway, 45.8 per cent in Denmark, 45.8 per cent in the United States, 45.7 per cent in Poland, 45.1 per cent in Portugal and 45.0 per cent in Canada. In the same year female participation rates were 83.3 per cent in Iceland, 76.3 per cent in Sweden, 75.3 per cent in Norway, 74.0 per cent in Denmark, 72.0 per cent in the United States and 70.6 per cent in Finland, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Labour Force Statistics, 1976-1996, Paris, 1997 Google Scholar

For a survey and historiography of America's working women see Margaret Walsh, ‘Women's Place in the American Labor Force, 1870-1995’, History, 82, 268 (1997), pp. 563-81 Google Scholar

See, for example, Jacqueline Jones, Labor of Love, Labor of Sorrow: Black Women, Work and the Family, from Slavery to the present, New York, 1985; Delores Janiewski, Sisterhood Denied: Race, Gender and Class in a New South Community, Philadelphia, 1985; Elizabeth Clark-Lewis, Living In, Living Out: African American Domestics in Washington D.C. 1910-1940, Washington D.C., 1994 and Melinda Chateauvert, Marching Together: Women of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Urbana, 1998 Google Scholar

For a roundtable discussion of this book see ‘Symposium on Tera Hunter: To ‘Joy My Freedom: The Labor Historian's New Clothes’ [contributions from Dana Frank, Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Sharon Harley, Lawrence W. Levine and David Roediger], Labor History, 39, 2 (1998), pp. 169-87 Google Scholar

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