Sculpture Journal

William Mitchell and the London County Council: the evolution of a classless form of public art

Sculpture Journal (2012), 21, (1), 57–70.

Abstract

London-born artist William Mitchell was employed by the London County Council (LCC) as a design consultant from 1957 to 1965. His role enabled him to create a wide range of artworks on housing estates throughout London, particularly exploring innovative techniques in concrete, resin, and mosaic. The technical and aesthetic skills Mitchell built up in conjunction with the LCC architects and contractors were instrumental in shaping his approach to subsequent work, helping him to develop a recognizable style that became known throughout Britain and internationally. These experiences led to his working with the most notable professionals of the day, including architects Frederick Gibberd and George Perkin, the Cement and Concrete Association and John Laing Research and Development. This article will examine how the Design Consultant Scheme and its emphasis on close working relationships shaped an artist who was both respected by his contemporaries and in tune with the public.

Access Token
£25.00
READ THIS ARTICLE
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Details

Author details

Pereira, Dawn