The Byron Journal

Byron's Indebtedness to Martial and Catullus

The Byron Journal (2011), 39, (1), 45–53.

Abstract

Byron was interested in the epigram throughout his life, and learned the art of writing epigrams primarily by reading Catullus and Martial, though Alexander Pope was also an influence. Byron not only translated and imitated the Romans' epigrams but also wrote his own. He was interested, like the Romans, in dealing with quotidian human activities such as love, friendship, wining, dining and so forth. On top of these topics, Byron makes a point of following in the Romans' footsteps by using the form to comment on the writing profession. This article demonstrates the extent to which Byron shared, and was indebted to, some of the epigrammatical tendencies of Martial and Catullus, as well as, to a lesser degree, Pope.

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Author details

Higashinaka, Itsuyo