Labour History Review

‘To bridle the falsehood of unconscionable workmen, and for her own satisfaction’: what the Jacobean housewife needed to know about men's work, and why

Labour History Review (1998), 63, (1), 4–30.

Abstract

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As the anthropologist Marilyn Strathern has observed, ‘It is quite clear that as a metaphor, "construction" has had its day’: Tim Ingold, ed. Key Debates in Anthropologys, 1996, p. 131. Cf. Kirsten Hastrup, A Passage to Anthropology between Experience and Theory, 1995, pp. 74-5 Google Scholar

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For historians' tendency to sniff with contempt at the supposedly unreal content of agricultural advice manuals, see Joan Thirsk, ‘Making a Fresh Start: Sixteenth-Century Agriculture and the Classical Inspiration’, in Michael Leslie and Timothy Raylor (eds), Culture and Cultivation in Early Modern England: Writing and the Land, Leicester, 1992, p. 23 Culture and Cultivation in Early Modern England: Writing and the Land 23 Google Scholar

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Its recommendations are thus used to elucidate the recipes found in a MS. recipe collection from 1604: Hilary Spurling, Elinor Fettipkce's Receipt Book, Harmondsworth, 1986, index Google Scholar

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Thomas Tusser, Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry, ed. G. Grigson, Oxford, 1984; all further references are to this edition. I have also made use of recent sourcebook editions of a number of other documents to aid the reader's access to the primary materials; and have presented quoted material in ‘modern’ English Five Hundred Points of Good Husbandry Google Scholar

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Roberts, Michael