Australian Journal of French Studies

Unspeakable Monsters: Grotesque Bodies and Discourse in Victor Hugo’s Notre-Dame de Paris and L’Homme qui rit

Australian Journal of French Studies (2018), 55, (2), 122–137.

Abstract

This article shows how the Hugolian monster’s speech metamorphoses into a new deformed discourse. The hybrid and excessive physical forms of two key monsters – Quasimodo of Notre-Dame de Paris and Gwynplaine of L’Homme qui rit – become mirrored in the contours of their language. The text, in turn, transforms into a foire-like spectacle where grotesque discourse is the headline performer. This revolution of literary form invites discussion of the socio-political dimensions of the works. Throwing a spotlight on reader-spectators as well as text-spectacle, this study interrogates both the nineteenth-century desire for deformity and our own contemporary thirst for the monstrous.

Access Token
£25.00
READ THIS ARTICLE
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Details

Author details

Patterson, Jade

Table of Contents

Section TitlePage
_GoBack1
_Hlk5001446152
_Hlk50395922112
_Hlk50446281612