Quaker Studies

Quaker Women and Anti-Slavery Activism: Eleanor Clark and the Free Labour Cotton Depot in Street

Quaker Studies (2014), 19, (1), 137–156.

Abstract

This article explores the anti-slavery activity of Quaker Eleanor Stephens Clark. It concerns a ‘depot’ or shop that she ran from 1853 until 1858, selling cotton goods cultivated by free-labour, rather than slave labour. This was part of the ‘Free Produce Movement’ which promoted a boycott of slave-made goods and thus offered shoppers a practical contribution to abolitionism or even a remedy for the problem of slavery. The political, commercial and social aspects of Clark's shop provide the basis for a discussion of a Quaker women's anti-slavery activity, and the practical impact that it made on free-produce shoppers in the locale.

Quaker Women and Anti-Slavery Activism: Eleanor Clark and the Free Labour Cotton Depot in Street

Abstract

This article explores the anti-slavery activity of Quaker Eleanor Stephens Clark. It concerns a ‘depot’ or shop that she ran from 1853 until 1858, selling cotton goods cultivated by free-labour, rather than slave labour. This was part of the ‘Free Produce Movement’ which promoted a boycott of slave-made goods and thus offered shoppers a practical contribution to abolitionism or even a remedy for the problem of slavery. The political, commercial and social aspects of Clark's shop provide the basis for a discussion of a Quaker women's anti-slavery activity, and the practical impact that it made on free-produce shoppers in the locale.


Details

Author details

Kett, Anna Vaughan