Hunter Gatherer Research

Introduction

Reflections on Inuit and subsistence in the twenty-first century

Hunter Gatherer Research (2017), 3, (4), 559–566.

Abstract

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References

Burch, E 1994. The future of hunter-gatherer research. In Burch, E & Ellanna, L (eds) Key issues in hunter-gatherer research. Oxford: Berg:441–455. Google Scholar

BurnSilver, S & Magdanz, J 2019. Heterogeneity in mixed economies: implications for sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):601–633. Google Scholar

Cameron, E 2012. Securing indigenous politics: a critique of the vulnerability of adaptation to the human dimensions of climate change in the Canadian Arctic. Global Environmental Change 22(1):103–114. Google Scholar

Cameron, E, Mearns, R & McGrath, J 2015. Translating climate change: adaptation, resilience, and climate politics in Nunavut, Canada. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 105(2):271–283. Google Scholar

Clancy, P 1987. The making of eskimo policy in Canada, 1952–62. Life and times of the Eskimo Affairs Committee. Arctic 40(3):646–656. Google Scholar

Collings, P 2019. Technology, knowledge and beluga whales in Ulukhaktok, NT, Canada. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):697–715. Google Scholar

Damas, D 2002. Arctic migrants, Arctic villagers: the transformation of Inuit settlement in the Central Arctic. Montréal: McGill-Queen’s Press. Google Scholar

Graburn, N 1969. Eskimos without igloos: social and economic development in Sugluk. Boston, MA: Little, Brown. Google Scholar

Halboom, B & Natcher, D 2012. The power and peril of vulnerability: approaching community labels with caution in climate change research. Arctic 65(3):319–327. Google Scholar

Gombay, N 2019. ‘There’s no one way of doing things’: wildlife management and environmentality in Nunavik. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):651–675. Google Scholar

Hall, E & Sanders, T 2015. Accountability and the academy: producing knowledge about the human dimensions of climate change. JRAI: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (NS) 21:438–461. Google Scholar

Jenness, D 1922. The life of the Copper Eskimos. Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913–18, Vol XII. Ottawa: FC Acland. Google Scholar

Jorgensen, J 1990. Oil age Eskimos. Berkeley: University of California Press. Google Scholar

Kemp, W 1971. The flow of energy in a hunting society. Scientific American 225(3):105–115. Google Scholar

Langdon, S 1991. The integration of cash and subsistence resources in Southwest Alaska Yup’ik Eskimo communities. In Peterson, N & Matsuyama, T (eds) Cash, commoditisation and changing foragers. Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology:269–291. Google Scholar

Lee, R & DeVore, B (eds) 1968. Man the hunter. Chicago: Aldine. Google Scholar

Murphy, R & Steward J 1955. Tappers and trappers: parallel processes in acculturation. Economic Development and Culture Change 4:335–355. Google Scholar

Natcher, DC 2019. Subsistence, regional planning and the cultural carrying capacity of First Nations in Alberta, Canada. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):717–737. Google Scholar

Polanyi, K 1977. The two meanings of economic. In Pearson, H (ed) The livelihood of man. Studies in social discontinuity. New York: Academic Press:19–34. Google Scholar

Quintal-Marineau, M 2019. ‘Feeding our families; that’s what we have been doing for centuries’: Inuit women’s sharing practices and strategies. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):583–599. Google Scholar

Ready, E 2019. Why subsistence matters. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):635–649. Google Scholar

Sahlins, M 1999. What is anthropological enlightenment? Some lessons from the twentieth century. Annual Review of Anthropology 28:i–xxiii. Google Scholar

Searles, EQ 2019. ‘Fresh seal blood looks like beauty and life’: #sealfies and subsistence in Nunavut. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):677–696. Google Scholar

Stanfield, J, Carroll, R & Wrenn, M 2007. Karl Polanyi on the limitations of formalism in economics. In Wood, DC (ed) Choice in economic contexts: ethnographic and theoretical inquiries. Research in Economic Anthropology Vol 25. Bingley: Emerald:241–266. Google Scholar

Vallee, F 1962. Kabloona and Eskimo in the Central Keewatin. Ottawa: Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. Google Scholar

Wenzel, GW 1991. Animal rights, human rights: ecology, economy and ideology in the Canadian Arctic. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Google Scholar

Wenzel, GW 2019. Canadian Inuit subsistence: antinomies of the mixed economy. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):567–581. Google Scholar

Wilmott, W 1961. The Eskimo community at Port Harrison, PQ. Ottawa: Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. Google Scholar

Burch, E 1994. The future of hunter-gatherer research. In Burch, E & Ellanna, L (eds) Key issues in hunter-gatherer research. Oxford: Berg:441–455. Google Scholar

BurnSilver, S & Magdanz, J 2019. Heterogeneity in mixed economies: implications for sensitivity and adaptive capacity. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):601–633. Google Scholar

Cameron, E 2012. Securing indigenous politics: a critique of the vulnerability of adaptation to the human dimensions of climate change in the Canadian Arctic. Global Environmental Change 22(1):103–114. Google Scholar

Cameron, E, Mearns, R & McGrath, J 2015. Translating climate change: adaptation, resilience, and climate politics in Nunavut, Canada. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 105(2):271–283. Google Scholar

Clancy, P 1987. The making of eskimo policy in Canada, 1952–62. Life and times of the Eskimo Affairs Committee. Arctic 40(3):646–656. Google Scholar

Collings, P 2019. Technology, knowledge and beluga whales in Ulukhaktok, NT, Canada. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):697–715. Google Scholar

Damas, D 2002. Arctic migrants, Arctic villagers: the transformation of Inuit settlement in the Central Arctic. Montréal: McGill-Queen’s Press. Google Scholar

Graburn, N 1969. Eskimos without igloos: social and economic development in Sugluk. Boston, MA: Little, Brown. Google Scholar

Halboom, B & Natcher, D 2012. The power and peril of vulnerability: approaching community labels with caution in climate change research. Arctic 65(3):319–327. Google Scholar

Gombay, N 2019. ‘There’s no one way of doing things’: wildlife management and environmentality in Nunavik. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):651–675. Google Scholar

Hall, E & Sanders, T 2015. Accountability and the academy: producing knowledge about the human dimensions of climate change. JRAI: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (NS) 21:438–461. Google Scholar

Jenness, D 1922. The life of the Copper Eskimos. Report of the Canadian Arctic Expedition 1913–18, Vol XII. Ottawa: FC Acland. Google Scholar

Jorgensen, J 1990. Oil age Eskimos. Berkeley: University of California Press. Google Scholar

Kemp, W 1971. The flow of energy in a hunting society. Scientific American 225(3):105–115. Google Scholar

Langdon, S 1991. The integration of cash and subsistence resources in Southwest Alaska Yup’ik Eskimo communities. In Peterson, N & Matsuyama, T (eds) Cash, commoditisation and changing foragers. Osaka: National Museum of Ethnology:269–291. Google Scholar

Lee, R & DeVore, B (eds) 1968. Man the hunter. Chicago: Aldine. Google Scholar

Murphy, R & Steward J 1955. Tappers and trappers: parallel processes in acculturation. Economic Development and Culture Change 4:335–355. Google Scholar

Natcher, DC 2019. Subsistence, regional planning and the cultural carrying capacity of First Nations in Alberta, Canada. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):717–737. Google Scholar

Polanyi, K 1977. The two meanings of economic. In Pearson, H (ed) The livelihood of man. Studies in social discontinuity. New York: Academic Press:19–34. Google Scholar

Quintal-Marineau, M 2019. ‘Feeding our families; that’s what we have been doing for centuries’: Inuit women’s sharing practices and strategies. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):583–599. Google Scholar

Ready, E 2019. Why subsistence matters. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):635–649. Google Scholar

Sahlins, M 1999. What is anthropological enlightenment? Some lessons from the twentieth century. Annual Review of Anthropology 28:i–xxiii. Google Scholar

Searles, EQ 2019. ‘Fresh seal blood looks like beauty and life’: #sealfies and subsistence in Nunavut. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):677–696. Google Scholar

Stanfield, J, Carroll, R & Wrenn, M 2007. Karl Polanyi on the limitations of formalism in economics. In Wood, DC (ed) Choice in economic contexts: ethnographic and theoretical inquiries. Research in Economic Anthropology Vol 25. Bingley: Emerald:241–266. Google Scholar

Vallee, F 1962. Kabloona and Eskimo in the Central Keewatin. Ottawa: Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. Google Scholar

Wenzel, GW 1991. Animal rights, human rights: ecology, economy and ideology in the Canadian Arctic. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Google Scholar

Wenzel, GW 2019. Canadian Inuit subsistence: antinomies of the mixed economy. Hunter Gatherer Research 3(4):567–581. Google Scholar

Wilmott, W 1961. The Eskimo community at Port Harrison, PQ. Ottawa: Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. Google Scholar

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Details

Author details

Wenzel, George W

Natcher, David C

Wenzel, George W

Natcher, David C