The Indexer: The International Journal of Indexing

Footnotes, endnotes and the indexer

The Indexer: The International Journal of Indexing (2014), 32, (1), 18–22.

Abstract

Mary Russell explores some of the issues that footnotes and endnotes raise for indexers. Some indexers and some clients take it for granted that footnotes and endnotes should never be indexed: others are at the opposite end of the spectrum and assume that footnotes and endnotes should be indexed in minute detail. Leaving aside specialist areas such as the law and author citation in scholarly texts, the consensus amongst indexers and clients is that if a footnote or endnote adds new information of substance, it should be indexed, otherwise not. Determining how to indicate to the reader where the indexed information is located can be quite complicated. The rule is to keep the notation as simple, as self-explanatory and as logical as possible. And unless the indexer is totally confident that the user needs no guidance, the conventions used by the indexer should be explained in the headnote or, better still, in a running footnote.

If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Chicago manual of style (2010) 16th edition. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press. www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html Google Scholar

Coates, S. (2013) ‘Author citations and the indexer’, The Indexer 31(3), C1. Author citations and the indexer The Indexer 31 C1 Google Scholar

Mulvany, N. (2005) Indexing books, 2nd edn. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press. Indexing books Google Scholar

If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Details

Author details

Russell, Mary