Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire

The Interwar Politics of the Liverpool Irish: A Story of God, Class, and National Identity

Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire (2018), 167, (1), 131–155.

Abstract

Liverpool stands as an outlier in British political history. The host of a sizeable Irish population, the sectarian dimension of its politics was pronounced and welldocumented. Though much has already been written on the topic, this article explores the link between religion and voting behaviour in interwar Merseyside. It begins with a simple quantitative reappraisal of some of the existing scholarship before turning to a broader examination of the politics of the city’s Irish population. In doing so, this study makes extensive use of the papers of the Catholic Archdiocese of Liverpool – an arguably underused resource – and will in particular explore the political activities of Archbishops Keating and Downey. It will show that Labour, a party already squeezed between competing religious traditions, was also a victim of a Church keen to preserve its political influence.

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Details

Author details

Evans, James R.