Labour History: A Journal of Labour and Social History

The Commonwealth Investigation Branch and the Political Construction of the Australian Citizenry, 1920-40

Labour History: A Journal of Labour and Social History (1998), 75, (1), 155–174.

Abstract

This article examines the Commonwealth’s conception of political undesirability between the wars as embodied in policies governing the boundary of citizenship and the movement of people. The article focuses on the role of the Commonwealth Investigation Branch (CIB) in the formulation of criteria of political undesirability and the development and operation of mechanisms for the application of such criteria to these policies. It is argued that following the Great War the Commonwealth’s conception of the desirable citizen expanded to include characteristics relating to political ideas and behaviour. An analysis of the Commonwealth’s policies of naturalisation, immigration, deportation, the compulsory registration of aliens, and passports provides insights into the official conception of the Australian citizenry. Further, the article argues that the CIB’s role in these policies occupied a substantial proportion of its time, and that its role was significant for the application of political criteria to these policies.

Access Token
£25.00

Details

Author details

Dutton, David

Table of Contents

Section TitlePage
1551
1562
1573
1584
1595
1606
1617
1628
1639
16410
16511
16612
16713
16814
16915
17016
17117
17218
17319