Catalan Review

THEATRICAL REPRESENTATIONS OF ST. CHRISTOPHER THROUGHOUT THE CROWN OF ARAGON DURING THE MIDDLE AGES

Catalan Review (2006), 20, (1), 273–290.

Abstract

As the patron of travelers, Sr. Christopher inspired one of the most popular cults to spread throughout medieval Europe. The Iberian Peninsula was no exception: his gigantic following spanned the region and his image adorned the walls of most churches and cathedrals. Manifestations were not limited to the plastic arts, however, and paratheatrical representations of St. Christopher were fairly common in processions celebrating Corpus Christi and other religious holidays, especially in Valencia, where the saint enjoyed even greater esteem. Furthermore, the mystery of his conversi on and martyrdom was also staged during religious festivals during the fifteenth cenrury. This essay traces the evolution of the hugely popular cult of St. Christopher in medieval Iberia by looking at various artistic (re)presentations of the converted Canaanite, paying special attention to the Valencian processions and two extant autos sacramentales—one written in Valencian and the other in Castilian.

Access Token
£25.00
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here
If you have private access to this content, please log in with your username and password here

Details

Author details

Grubbs, Anthony J.